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BBC Science in Action
When Sunday
Start Time: 09.00
Finish: 09.30

BBC Science in Action and science is the key to development in the modern world. Wouldn’t it be a shame to be in the dark on what is happening in the world of science.

Phuket Island radio here in Thailand open up the learning opportunities via the BBC Science in Action program, therefore tuning into 91.5 & 102.5 FM on a Sunday and listening to Phuket and it’s finest FM radio station is probably a good idea. Listen to BBC Science in Action every Sunday morning at 9am for your weekly taste of scientific developments.

Jack Stewart host of BBC Science in Action

Jack Stewart host of BBC Science in Action

Brought to you by 91.5 & 102.5 FM from the BBC Science in Action team and presented by Jack Stewart, BBC Science in Action compiles science issues of the week from renowned science magazines.

Just because you may not have much knowledge in the field of science doesn’t mean that you can’t understand it. Science in Action gives you contemporary scientific news in a straightforward manner in a language that can be understood. Understood by all, not just scientists.

BBC Science in Action on Phuket Radio?

Maybe you’re wondering why you should listen to a program about science, especially if you’ve never really found it a topic of interest before. Don’t immediately forgo Science in Action, as you are sure to come across an episode with content that will spark your interest. Don’t miss the other BBC shows on the weekend, like Click, Discovery and Health Check. Science covers such a wide array of topics, from dinosaurs to earthquakes that are relevant in all aspects of life, what is there not to find interesting?

Take advantage of the fact that Phuket Island Radio  offers you internet radio making it a reality to listen to Science in Action from the BBC in London broadcasting in Phuket Thailand and all four corners of the globe. 91.5 & 102.5 FM allows you to find out Phuket news as well as global news. Even if you don’t live in Phuket Thailand and are only here for a holiday, Phuket Island Radio makes it so that you don’t have to be scared of feeling out of the loop with current events. Visit 91.5 FM & 102.5 FM on air and online and see for yourself what we have to offer!

For more on our BBC shows, international DJ line up and other shows, click here.

Science in Action from the BBC on Phuket FM Radio

Press PLAY and listen to this weeks show 

Press PLAY and listen to this weeks show 

On this edition of Science in Action,

While developing new treatments drug companies usually release little useful information on how the clinical trials are progressing.

However with the world’s attention on potential vaccines against Covid -19. Usually dull data on the progression of each trial step is subject to huge scrutiny. It doesn’t help to clarify things says epidemiologist Nicole Basta when that data raises questions about the rigour of the trial itself. This seems to be what happened with the latest Astra Zeneca, and Oxford University trial – where the best results were reportedly due to a mistake.

Locust plagues

The link between locust plagues and extreme weather was demonstrated once again when cyclone Gati hit Somalia – dumping 2 years worth of rain in just a few days. This creates a perfect environment for locusts to breed to plague proportions. And this will be the third time in as many years that cyclones will trigger such an effect says Keith Cressman from the UNFAO. However thanks to the previous recent locust plagues in East Africa the countries most in line for this returning locust storm are better prepared this time.

A study of tree rings from Greater Mongolia suggests the region is now drying out rapidly, the past 20 years have been drier than the past thousand says climate scientist Hans Liderholm. This points to potential desertification in coming years. And the death of a scientific icon. The Arecibo observatory, featured in the films ‘Goldeneye’ and ‘Contact’, and responsible for the Nobel Prize winning detection of gravitational waves is facing demolition.

Sitting in a crater in the jungles of Puerto Rico this 57 year old radio telescope dish has suffered severe storm damage and is in danger of collapse. Astronomer Anne Virkki, who works at the telescope and science writer Shannon Stirone explain its significance. (Image: Credit: Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle

BBC Science in Action is presented by Roland Pease and is available right here on Phuket FM Radio 91.5 and 102.5 FM. 

BBC Science in Action – Latest News